TerraZone

logo terrazone
Zero trust: building a mixed estate

Introduction to Zero Trust

The traditional security model, which is based on the assumption that everything inside the network can be trusted, is no longer effective. As the threat landscape continues to evolve and expand, it is becoming increasingly clear that organizations must adopt a new security approach that assumes everything outside and inside the network is not trusted. This new approach is known as Zero Trust.

Zero Trust is a security model that emphasizes the need to verify and authenticate every access request before granting access to a resource. It is an approach that assumes that no user, device, or application can be trusted until it is authenticated and authorized to access a resource. In other words, Zero Trust is a security model that requires organizations to adopt a mindset of “never trust, always verify.”

Traditional Security Approaches

Traditional security approaches are based on the assumption that everything inside the network can be trusted. This approach relies on a perimeter-based security model that is designed to keep external threats out of the network. However, this approach has several weaknesses. First, it assumes that the internal network is safe and trustworthy, which is no longer true. Second, it is designed to protect against external threats, but it does not provide sufficient protection against internal threats. Third, it does not take into account the mobility of users and devices, which can move between internal and external networks.

The Evolution of Zero Trust

Zero Trust is not a new concept. It was first introduced by Forrester Research in 2010. However, it has evolved significantly over the years. Today, Zero Trust is more than just a security model; it is a comprehensive security strategy that includes policies, procedures, and technologies designed to protect an organization’s assets and data.

The Core Principles of Zero Trust

Zero Trust is based on four core principles, which are:

a. Verify Explicitly

Every access request must be explicitly verified and authenticated before access is granted to a resource. This means that every user, device, and application must be identified and authenticated before access is granted.

b. Use Least Privilege Access

Access should be granted on a need-to-know basis. This means that users, devices, and applications should only be granted access to the resources that they need to perform their job functions.

c. Assume Breach

Organizations should assume that they have already been breached and that attackers are already inside the network. This means that organizations should adopt a proactive approach to security, which involves continuous monitoring and analysis of network traffic.

c. Assume Breach

Organizations should never trust any user, device, or application until it has been explicitly verified and authenticated. This means that access requests should be verified and authenticated every time, even for users and devices that have been previously granted access.

FAQ

Traditional security is based on the assumption that everything inside the network can be trusted, while Zero Trust assumes that nothing can be trusted and requires verification and authentication of every access request.

The core principles of Zero Trust are verify explicitly, use least privilege access, assume breach, and never trust, always verify.

Yes, Zero Trust can be implemented in a hybrid cloud environment by segmenting the network, controlling access, and continuous monitoring and logging.

The benefits of implementing Zero Trust in a mixed estate include improved security, better visibility, enhanced compliance, and reduced risk.

The challenges of implementing Zero Trust in a mixed estate include complexity, resistance to change, and lack of resources.

Implementing Zero Trust in a Mixed Estate

Implementing Zero Trust in a mixed estate, which includes on-premises, cloud-based, and hybrid environments, can be challenging. However, there are several steps that organizations can take to implement Zero Trust in a mixed estate, including:

a. Identify the Assets and Data

The first step in implementing Zero Trust in a mixed estate is identifying the assets and data that need protection. This includes identifying the devices, applications, and data critical to the organization’s operations.

b. Segmenting the Network

Once the assets and data have been identified, the next step is to segment the network. Network segmentation involves dividing the network into smaller segments and controlling the flow of traffic between these segments. This helps to limit the impact of a security breach and prevent attackers from moving laterally through the network.

c. Controlling Access

Controlling Access is a critical component of Zero Trust. Access should be granted on a need-to-know basis, and users, devices, and applications should only be granted Access to the resources needed to perform their job functions. Access should also be continuously monitored and analyzed for any suspicious activity.

d. Monitoring and Logging

Continuous monitoring and logging are essential components of Zero Trust. This involves monitoring network traffic, analyzing access logs, and detecting suspicious activity. It also involves collecting and analyzing data from various sources, such as endpoints, servers, and applications, to detect and respond to security threats.

The Benefits of Zero Trust in a Mixed Estate

Implementing Zero Trust in a mixed estate has several benefits. These include:

a. Improved Security

Zero Trust provides a more secure environment by assuming that everything inside and outside the network is untrustworthy. This helps to prevent security breaches and limit their impact.

b. Better Visibility

Zero Trust provides better visibility into network activity, making detecting and responding to security threats easier. This includes real-time monitoring of network traffic and access logs.

c. Enhanced Compliance

Zero Trust can help organizations meet compliance requirements by better-controlling Access to sensitive data and resources. It also helps to ensure that Access is granted on a need-to-know basis.

d. Reduced Risk

Implementing Zero Trust can help to reduce the Risk of security breaches and limit their impact. This can help minimize the financial and reputational damage resulting from a security breach.

The Challenges of Implementing Zero Trust

Implementing Zero Trust in a mixed estate can be challenging. Some of the challenges include the following:

a. Complexity

Implementing Zero Trust requires a significant investment in time and resources. It can also be complex, especially in mixed estates, including on-premises, cloud-based, and hybrid environments.

b. Resistance to Change

Implementing Zero Trust requires a significant shift in mindset and culture. This can be challenging, especially in organizations that are resistant to change.

c. Lack of Resources

Implementing Zero Trust requires significant time and resources, including personnel, tools, and technologies. This can be a challenge for organizations with limited resources.

Conclusion

Zero Trust is a security model emphasizing the need to verify and authenticate every access request before granting Access to a resource. It is an approach that assumes that no user, device, or application can be trusted until it is authenticated and authorized to access a resource. Implementing Zero Trust in a mixed estate can be challenging, but it provides several benefits, including improved security, better visibility, enhanced compliance, and reduced Risk.

More Use Case